Thread Number: 10870
Refurbishing a Hoover brushroll?
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Post# 117456   12/7/2010 at 17:49 (3,235 days old) by athanasius80 (Huntington Beach CA)        

Hey guys,
I got the Hoover 700 out, took the brushroll out, and I need to get it rebristled. Who is rebristling brushrolls, and how do I get the brushroll apart to get the strips out?
Thanks!





Post# 117462 , Reply# 1   12/7/2010 at 18:16 (3,235 days old) by animebsd ()        
hello

on these models there should be screws holding in the brush stips


just simply twist off the end bearing caps and unscrew the screws on the strips and slid em off VOLA!

somtimes the screws like to hide under the brissels on the brush so look carefully

:P
goodluck!

-Brandon


Post# 117470 , Reply# 2   12/7/2010 at 18:38 (3,235 days old) by athanasius80 (Huntington Beach CA)        

I got it that far, my brushroll appears to have the ends riveted on...

Post# 117545 , Reply# 3   12/8/2010 at 16:58 (3,234 days old) by hooverbaby (Dalton in Furness, UK)        
looks like..

hooverbaby's profile picture
you may have sprung in brushes if it's an original Hoover model 700 from the '20s. Some machines have had the original brushroller upgraded or modified using bits off other machines.

Usually, you have to press down and towards the centre on one end of the brush closest to the belt pulley; the brush should then spring out. It's not necessary to dismantle the roller to do this but probably advisable anyway, since the bearings will at least want regreasing. If you are unfortunate in finding them seized solid, it might be necessary to soak the housings in oil or apply heat to free them.

Start by unscrewing one end cap, then attempt to knock the shaft out carefully with a hammer. You have to watch the housings, which are sometimes rivetted on; the small rivets can break unless you drill them out when the shaft is seized in tight but it doesn't matter that much, the main thing is to ensure that the bearings turn freely. The shaft will usually come out with the other end cap, then place mole grips on the shaft and undo the cap. I then place the shaft back through the roller into the other bearing and drive that out. If you're lucky, it will come out easily. If not, the bearing may break apart, in which case the shell won't come out easily, then the housing will have to be removed, heated or left soaking and a punch used to remove the remains of the bearing shell from behind.

It's not always as easy as it sounds; sometimes the brushes can corrode and even crumble away; they show signs of white powdery deposits as they begin to rot, usually if they're left somewhere very damp. Therefore go easy on them but if they come out in one piece, they can be rebristled. New ones are obsolete but you might find a collector with some NOS ones and they're not that hard to do yourself, only a little time consuming.

Hope this helps,

Stephen


Post# 117631 , Reply# 4   12/9/2010 at 14:33 (3,233 days old) by hooverbaby (Dalton in Furness, UK)        
forgot to mention..

hooverbaby's profile picture
that early 700 machines had a slightly different brushroll with little 'eyes' that slide to one side before the brushes can be removed.

Stephen





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