Thread Number: 36600  /  Tag: 50s/60s/70s Vacuum Cleaners
Student Film About Vacuums
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Post# 391933   5/13/2018 at 19:38 by nnapps879 (Chicago)        

Hi! My name is Nicolas Nappa, I am an independent filmmaker and I am currently writing a movie that is centered around a small vacuum shop. I have a couple of vacuum related research questions that I'd like to ask you all. I would really appreciate any feedback you can give me! Thank you so much.

1. What do you find specifically interesting about vintage vacuum cleaners?
2. Do you spend any time at a local vacuum shop? If so, how would you describe the environment ? Welcoming?
3. Do you find the assembly of vacuum cleaners to be enjoyable or is just the collection of a vacuum enjoyable?
4. Is there a strong sense of community amongst vacuum enthusiasts?
5. Do vacuum enthusiasts enjoy both contemporary and vintage vacuums? Or is there any debate over the two?
6. What is a favorite make and or model of a vintage vacuum?
7. Is there a market for vintage vacuums? Do people auction them?

If you would like to send me any feedback more privately, you can reach me at nicknappa@gmail.com

Thanks again!





Post# 391935 , Reply# 1   5/13/2018 at 20:48 by MadMan (Chicago, IL, USA)        

madman's profile picture
3 - It's not the assembly/disassembly of a vacuum (or anything else), it's the challenge of the repair or restoration. Teardown and assembly is just part of the journey.

...Though I suppose teardown can be fun if there's some mystery inside. ie - discovering how it was designed, or why it failed.


Post# 391938 , Reply# 2   5/13/2018 at 21:37 by Lesinutah (Utah)        
Reply

lesinutah's profile picture
1. Just the mystique of old machines brought back to life. America likes vacuums built in America and vintage vacuums America was old steel mill hardworking blue collar people building vacuums. America was where the best vacuums were built and sold. We have pride in being the best.
2. I rarely go to vacuum shops. They are a bunch of know it all blow hard who don't give 2 $hits about older vacuums only new 2 or 3 brands. I think this vacuum shop brand loyalty to new vacuums is one of reasons vacuum shops are a dying breed.
3. I like to fix things. You have a 60 year old forgotten neglected piece of history and you bring it to life. It's good karma bringing old new again. It's natural human nature like we're helping vacuums be useful again. I don't know just old new good karma.
4. There is a bond. I'm not sure old tymers are as welcoming newer members. I think they stick to people they know. I know I come across as wacky ideas opinionated and probably annoying to old members. It's fair I'm very brash blunt but my ideas are great and helpful. That's all my opinion of me and what I see nobody else's just mine.
5. I think there are 3 types of collectors.
1 it's love is vintage and likes and respects newer vacuums. 2 person loves new and likes and appreciates vintage. 3 is a vacuum lover who loves all vacuums.

6. Kirby 505 and dual sanitronic 80.
7. The market is very niche for vintage. You have rich spoiled kids with loads of cash buying but don't appreciate the work it takes to build a vintage vacuum. There is tight words who collect of classifieds and look for good deal. I fall into that category. The last is a little older who collect vacuums either enormous amounts or just a few. The people with meseum collections have been In vacuum arena whole life and are well to do. People who have few are imo blue collar hard work make best of what you have. Vacuum people are good people. I don't know it's just a feeling vacuum people have integrity and are generally good human beings with good values. We might come in all shapes and sizes different backgrounds but g there is no judgment on anything other than vacuum knowledge. That is what I like the best.
Les



Post# 391976 , Reply# 3   5/15/2018 at 09:46 by dysonman1 (undisclosed)        

dysonman1's profile picture
1: Vintage vacuums are as interesting as new machines, since the 'final design' hasn't been finalized yet. All dryers are square boxes with rotating drums. All dryers (regardless of cost) dry clothes dry. Vacuums cannot remove ALL the dirt. Vacuums are the only major appliance sold by door to door salesmen, which contributes to the 'I'm the best' philosophy many people have about them.

2: I spent decades at the local vacuum shop, since I used to own one until I started the Vacuum Cleaner Museum. I worked six days per week for more than two decades. My shop was very welcoming of people, and I didn't judge anyone for the kind or type of vacuum they owned.

3: I love to work on (repair) as well as restore vacuums. I love understanding how all the parts go together. I can restore a 1910 Royal was easily as a 2017 Rainbow. Repairing vacuums is fun for me.

4: There is a strong sense of community among vacuum collectors, but there's also the segregation that comes along with it. Many vacuum collectors become involved with groups of fellow collectors, but those groups of vacuum friends are very splintered. Many times, the groups do not and will not interact with each other.
Just like car clubs. Many collectors disagree with other collectors and only want to be around people who share a love of a particular brand. Other collectors only want to interact with others of their own social standing. It is very fragmented. I've been a member of some vacuum collecting group or another for more than 25 years.

5: Part of the fragmentation of the vacuum groups as a whole relates to this question. There are those who collect only newer machines, and some who collect only very old machines. Many times, these two types of collectors don't see eye to eye. Some collectors collect both vintage as well as contemporary, but of only one brand (brand snobs). Some collect vintage and contemporary of all brands. Some collect only uprights. Some, only canisters. Some collect only rare machines, and some collect trash finds. Very seldom will vacuum collectors agree about anything to do with vacuums.

6: My favorites are all over the place, I like vintage as well as contemporary.

7: Vintage vacuums have a market value, but it changes all the time. Like with anything else, the rarity of the machine will determine it's sale price. For example, a Kenmore Whispertone from 1960 might go for $1000, while a Kenmore from 1961 might fetch $25. A Compact from 1962 with Power Nozzle might go for well over $1000, but a Compact from that same year without the power nozzle would be hard pressed to bring $50. You never know. The really early machines are no longer bringing high dollar since many vacuum collectors of the early machines have passed away recently, leaving younger people who tend not to want such very old cleaners.


Post# 391982 , Reply# 4   5/15/2018 at 12:57 by human (Pines of Carolina)        

human's profile picture
My responses:

1. What do you find specifically interesting about vintage vacuum cleaners?
-They are marvelously over-engineered machines. Even budget models were designed and built to last for decades.

2. Do you spend any time at a local vacuum shop? If so, how would you describe the environment ? Welcoming?
-I don't because I can find most everything I need at better prices online.

3. Do you find the assembly of vacuum cleaners to be enjoyable or is just the collection of a vacuum enjoyable?
-I find the challenge of diagnosing and solving the problems presented by a decades old machine enjoyable.

4. Is there a strong sense of community amongst vacuum enthusiasts?
-There is on this forum. Otherwise for me, it's a pretty solitary pursuit.

5. Do vacuum enthusiasts enjoy both contemporary and vintage vacuums? Or is there any debate over the two?
-Some do. I don't.

6. What is a favorite make and or model of a vintage vacuum?
-Electrolux and Kirby

7. Is there a market for vintage vacuums? Do people auction them?
-There are plenty of them up for bids on eBay but I doubt anybody buys vintage vacuums as an investment that will appreciate in value. The majority of people just see them as old junk, as evidenced by the fact that they generally go cheap at thrift shops and estate sales.


Post# 392077 , Reply# 5   5/18/2018 at 00:37 by vacuumdevil (Denver)        

vacuumdevil's profile picture
This is quite interesting is the film specifically about vacuums? or vacuums and autism together?





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