Thread Number: 35379  /  Tag: Recent Vacuum Cleaners from past 20 years
White scratche marks on vacuums
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Post# 380487   10/31/2017 at 18:50 by Evilvacuumman (Los Angeles)        

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Anyone one know a simple and easy way to get rid of those white scratche marks that are on vacuums?I have been using a magic eraser but it take a while and they disintegrate so I have to keep buying a lot of them. Dose anyone know a good way to get rid of them?

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Post# 380491 , Reply# 1   10/31/2017 at 19:27 by AmwayClearTrak (Honolulu, HI)        
This should work

A MagicEraser will do the trick. I have used them many times on my vacuum to get rid of paint marks and it's worked most of the time. Some paint scratches you have to scrub harder then others but they should come off with ease. Hope this helps!

Post# 380492 , Reply# 2   10/31/2017 at 19:28 by AmwayClearTrak (Honolulu, HI)        
Hey Ignore what I said on the top

Did not read it thoroughly. Whoops!

Post# 380495 , Reply# 3   10/31/2017 at 20:47 by Evilvacuumman (Los Angeles)        

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It's ok. Thanks for replying anyway

Post# 380496 , Reply# 4   10/31/2017 at 20:51 by FCS3 (Hawaii)        
Beware of chemical cleaners

Even simple rubbing alcohol or dilute Simple Green
may dull some plastics. Instead try vegetable oil.

You may want to test it on an accessory made of the
same plastic first.
Put your nozzle/PH in a pan or safe place in case
of drips. Pour vegetable oil on a folded paper towel
till its saturated, but not dripping. Lay the oil
soaked towel on the plastic (or vice-versa).
Let it sit for maybe a half hour. This should soften
up the paint enough so it can be gently "scrubbed"
with a wooden toothpick. A second application may be
necessary.
Gently clean off the vegetable oil residue with mild
dish soap and water on a sponge. Hold the part at an
angle where the water can run straight down and not
into the nozzle/PH.
This should work well since the paint wasn't wet when
it rubbed onto the plastic. But I cannot guarantee
success or no damage to the finish, just saying.


Post# 380505 , Reply# 5   11/1/2017 at 09:04 by kirbyvertibles (Independence, KS)        

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I've used hand sanitizer a lot however like stated before just beware of it compromising the look of the plastic.

Post# 380509 , Reply# 6   11/1/2017 at 10:03 by dysonman1 (Rolla, Missouri)        

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We use alcohol (rubbing alcohol) to remove paint and marks from plastic on all brands of vacuums.

Post# 380522 , Reply# 7   11/1/2017 at 12:03 by Ultralux88 (Denver, Colorado)        

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Rubbing alcohol as Tom said, or denatured alcohol. I use denatured at work because we buy it in big cans (just like lacquer thinner) at the hardware store. Works well, sometimes you just want to soak it with the stuff and let it sit a minute and then start scrubbing. Just make sure you keep plenty of alcohol on the rag, as it dries out it won't work as well.

Post# 380523 , Reply# 8   11/1/2017 at 12:04 by Ultralux88 (Denver, Colorado)        

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Also, adding the alcohol to the magic eraser instead of water really works well!

Post# 380525 , Reply# 9   11/1/2017 at 12:09 by Kirbysthebest (Wichita, KS)        

With above mentioned advice, the more stubborn marks may shift with a light touch and a scotch brite green pad, using a diluted alcohol or soap solution as a carrier.

Post# 380527 , Reply# 10   11/1/2017 at 12:15 by Ultralux88 (Denver, Colorado)        

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Also one I've been known to use. But one thing to consider, getting too aggressive with the removal can and will screw up the texture of the plastic, which in some cases can look even worse than the paint marks. Basically paint has rubbed off of the baseboard and is now smeared on the plastic, smooth plastic is easier to clean, because the texture is holding the paint in the low spots. You want to remove the paint without sanding the texture down too.

Post# 380549 , Reply# 11   11/1/2017 at 19:23 by Evilvacuumman (Los Angeles)        

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Thanks for all the reply. I tried the alcohol and it works great

Post# 380585 , Reply# 12   11/2/2017 at 18:34 by unconscious (London, UK)        

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Surprisingly, what I've used recently to refurb the base of a few vacuums I got my hands on was headlight polish paste. My mum got her hands on some somehow, it's a bit like Cif, but instead of scrubbing and scratching as such it's meant to polish. It's got some potent chemicals in it too, but it genuinely makes plastic look brand new. Have a look around, maybe ask in some local car parts store, car wash, etc?

I don't have any pics to prove but I was genuinely amazed at how well it worked removing surface paint as well as deep scratches leaving the surface smooth and shiny.


Post# 380593 , Reply# 13   11/2/2017 at 23:10 by Real1shep (Walla Walla, WA)        

Oh, I agree on the denatured alcohol....I use it exclusively to bring back plastic. Stronger chems work faster, but they also affect the plastic more.

Just be wary of anything with silk screening. I almost lost some Hoover lettering on a plastic Connie floor head using denatured alcohol on the letting....stupid, I knew beter.

Kevin





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