Thread Number: 34959  /  Tag: Recent Vacuum Cleaners from past 20 years
Why Domestic Canister Carpet Shampooers Are Rare
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Post# 377063   8/19/2017 at 14:54 by carolinaguy1996 (Candler, NC)        

To anyone who uses a canister shampooer, why are the domestic versions rare? I know the commercial verisons exist, and they can work fine.




Post# 377067 , Reply# 1   8/19/2017 at 15:27 by fan-of-fans (USA)        

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Probably for a number of reasons, some of the same ones that upright vacuums seem to be more popular now. First, most people want scrubbing action on the shampooer, and with a canister version this requires a lot of added cost and complication with a motorized power nozzle, solution and suction hoses. Upright versions are easier to set up and store than a canister unit with separate, hose, wands and nozzle.

At that time, Bissell and Kenmore were probably the bigger players in the market of household machines and only had the drum style cleaners. Then Regina came out with their upright machine with attachments, and by the time other brands such as Hoover and Eureka introduced models, they went straight with uprights and didn't bother making a canister version other than perhaps small ones for spot cleaning. Other than Rainbow, I don't really recall any household canister cleaning machines than the first two I mentioned.


Post# 377071 , Reply# 2   8/19/2017 at 15:53 by Rolls_rapide (Scotland)        
Depended on the market

Here in the UK, we had for example: Vax 121, Hoover Aquamaster, Electrolux Masterlux, and Goblin's version.

They did take a bit of effort to shampoo the carpet, especially when trying to remove most of the moisture you had just laid down into the carpet. Basically, very hard work - even for our small houses.

I've heard of folk buying one, using the shampoo mode once, then relegating it to the garage.

An upright machine is generally easier to use, since the agitator tends to be powered in most cases.


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Post# 377073 , Reply# 3   8/19/2017 at 16:04 by fan-of-fans (USA)        
Forgot about VAX!

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We had that orange model here in the States. It was in the Sears catalog, but I never saw any around.

Shop Vac had add on kits for their wet/dry vacuums that allowed hot water steam cleaning which connected to the faucets, and I think a self contained version later on. And Sears had their own version for their Craftsman wet/dry vacuums.


Post# 377077 , Reply# 4   8/19/2017 at 17:08 by Rolls_rapide (Scotland)        
Hoover Aquatronic 1100

Here's a link to the archives

CLICK HERE TO GO TO Rolls_rapide's LINK


Post# 377132 , Reply# 5   8/21/2017 at 08:22 by kirbyvertibles (Independence, KS)        

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Would the Thermax fall into this category? I do with it had a powered shampoo nozzle.
There are two I'd like to find that are super rare that I've only seen adds.

One- is made by Douglas and looks like a shop vac with a big square tank for the shampooing part and has a Douglas power nozzle for dry vacuuming.

The other was made by Regina. It's the Regina System III and looks just like the Thermax. A big rectangular machine and used the power nozzle used on their electrikbrooms for dry vacuuming. I have an Add i'll try to post


Post# 377140 , Reply# 6   8/21/2017 at 13:57 by n0oxy (Saint Louis Missouri, United States)        
canister kits

I don't think shopvac or sears make the kit anymore for the wet dry vacs, but I got the parts and made one myself, although mine is for cleaning bare floors and I can also clean couches. You need a wand with a jet, a water hose to connect to the faucet, and whatever attachment you want to use on the end, I actually have two wands, one fits mhy shopvac hose and the other fits my Sirena and they both work really well.
Mike


Post# 377147 , Reply# 7   8/21/2017 at 14:53 by gsheen (Cape Town South Africa)        

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Here in SA the Hoover Aquamaster was the first domestic carpet machine offered, using Exhaust air from the vac motor to pressurize a tank that then sent liquid to a nozzle, This was followed up by the aqua jet which used a small pump. Electrolux was quick to follow suit and then the Bissell big clean green machine was launched here. I have one of those. They are great for cleaning furniture and cars but for carpets, too much work.
We have a Hoover V2 for that, Recently its been giving some issues so I have had to rely on the bissell, I also have access to a few industrial units like the from machines like the Mytee speedster all the way to a truck mount its to much work to get them out to use most of the time. So I have just used the bissel and last week I got the V2 working again, what a difference, The carpet looks cleaner.
The upright machines just make life allot easier


Post# 377176 , Reply# 8   8/22/2017 at 12:06 by carolinaguy1996 (Candler, NC)        

I agree. Upright extractors tend to be more useful.

Post# 377179 , Reply# 9   8/22/2017 at 13:03 by Kirbysthebest (Wichita, KS)        

I have a Big Green Clean Machine can.  It's 20+ years old and still a pretty good machine.  I do feel that the uprights with some form of agitating brush is better, but in the beginning the Bissell machines did a good job as all we had.   The BGCM was one of Bissell's first self contained machines with a clean an dirty water tank, rather than having to hook a hose to the sink. 

 

It has cleaned  a lot of carpets in it's day.  Up until 2009 it was my only carpet cleaner, at that time I got a Hoover spin scrub, but sill use the BGCM on the lower pile indoor/outdoor type carpeting in the basement.

 




This post was last edited 08/22/2017 at 13:34
Post# 377212 , Reply# 10   8/23/2017 at 15:28 by dysonman1 (Rolla, Missouri)        

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Upright carpet shampooers tend to extract more water since the motor is so much closer to the rug, producing more suction right where it's needed.

Post# 377214 , Reply# 11   8/23/2017 at 17:47 by Rolls_rapide (Scotland)        

Not necessarily so.

Much depends upon the type of nozzle, suction power and how much force is applied to the nozzle to lock it to the carpet.

I've had more success removing water from the carpet with the Hoover Aquamaster, than an upright Bissell.


Post# 377248 , Reply# 12   8/25/2017 at 05:13 by mark40511 (Lexington, KY)        
No way

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The canisters can remove MORE water from the carpet than uprights (at least any upright that I've tried)...because you can force the wand onto the carpet to get more water out....With my upright, I have to literally tape a ten pound weight so it's heavier on the carpet and it extracts much more water this way. It makes the upright heavier but it makes it extract so much better. The uprights are not heavy enough where they meet the carpet.

Post# 377285 , Reply# 13   8/26/2017 at 14:25 by Numatic_boy (England)        
Cannisster cleaners in the UK

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As said before, these cleaners are very prevelant in the UK.I personally use a 1995 numatic george.Great cleaner but you have to force the wand in the carpet to get out the muck.My upright bissell washer had an isue.the brush woukd kick the cleaner head off the carpet and it didnt seal too right.Numatic machines are very poupular with car valeters due to the construction.These machines were a head of the time,they been utilizing a pump since tgey were introduced in the 80s when vaxs and hoover cleaners used a gravity feed style system.

Post# 377306 , Reply# 14   8/27/2017 at 02:36 by tolivac (Greenville,NC)        

Would a truckmount carpet-floor cleaning machine qualify as a "canister" unit?The one I tried was a Pro-Chem "Apex" model-was kinda neat to use!The canister "motor" is a Kubota 32Hp diesel-it turned a twin lobe suction pump and the solution pump.the solution was heated three ways-engine exhaust manifold,engine coolant,and the suction pump exhaust.The suction pump was like 200" @600CFM .There is a solution tank in the truck and the spent solution that was vacuumed up.

Post# 378978 , Reply# 15   9/27/2017 at 15:23 by carolinaguy1996 (Candler, NC)        

Maybe, maybe not.

Post# 379760 , Reply# 16   10/14/2017 at 16:35 by oldskoolguy (Chicago, Illinois)        

Dry foam shampooers are also pretty rare in the household too. Aerus makes a carpet shampooer with 3 round brushes, and Kirby makes a cylindrical brush shampoo system that can be used on the actual vacuum itself. Why that is I'm not sure, but I'm guessing that sucking up the dirty water eventually was proven to be more popular. There's some dry foam carpet shampooers on the commercial market, but that's another story

on the matter of canister shampooers, Rainbow makes a vacuum that comes with a carpet shampooer head, but that is sort of half upright, half-canister since the solution is sprayed from a tank on the head and then sucked up and collected in a bin. The handheld carpet shampooers on the market, at least some of them you could consider a canister (just depends really on the model) since it's a hose with a head and the solution comes from the actual machine and the water is also sucked back up to there.





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