Thread Number: 31349  /  Tag: 50s/60s/70s Vacuum Cleaners
Hoover Convertible Motor Troubleshooting
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Post# 346733   3/8/2016 at 10:40 (865 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

I have an older Convertible that runs perfectly smooth - except when I first turn it on after sitting. For the first few seconds of running after sitting, it sounds almost like dirt being picked up, but it is definitely coming from the motor as I hear this noise even if the base is up off the carpet when I turn it on. After a few seconds, the noise goes away and it just purrs. I did not notice anything obviously unusual when taking the motor apart and I have been regularly lubricating the bearings. Any input/troubleshooting tips would be greatly appreciated.




Post# 346735 , Reply# 1   3/8/2016 at 10:52 (865 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
Could be the possible start of warn bearings?

Or a slightly out of shape fan? eg. One of the blades slightly bent thus causing it to vibrate slightly upon start up?




This post was last edited 03/08/2016 at 15:36
Post# 346786 , Reply# 2   3/8/2016 at 20:11 (865 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

It is not quite a vibrating sound, and I have a washer between the fan and the bearing which should eliminate vibration. It almost sounds like a bunch of scraping noises inside the motor. It's not that loud at all; I just notice it and it seems to be progressing.

Post# 346792 , Reply# 3   3/8/2016 at 21:20 (865 days old) by vacuumlad1650 (Chicago Suburbs)        

vacuumlad1650's profile picture
Fans sound like they are rubbing mixed with bad bearings. They get mis-shaped over time of sitting

Post# 346838 , Reply# 4   3/9/2016 at 10:23 (864 days old) by kirbyvertibles (Independence, KS)        

kirbyvertibles's profile picture
maybe what you are hearing is the electrical arcing of the carbon brushes at first?

Post# 346882 , Reply# 5   3/9/2016 at 19:12 (864 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        
@kirbyvertibles:

It sounds like that could be it. Is this something I should address soon? The cleaner runs fine otherwise, just purrs like a Hoover should.

Post# 347068 , Reply# 6   3/11/2016 at 13:04 (862 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

I should have mentioned previously that this is an intermittent problem; I used it yesterday and did not hear the noise.

Post# 347339 , Reply# 7   3/13/2016 at 03:11 (860 days old) by MPN ()        

Hi,

It's likely a stretched area on the belt, as the vibration/noise ceases after the belt warms up.


Post# 347570 , Reply# 8   3/14/2016 at 18:53 (859 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

@MPN: There is definitely not any vibration nor is this a vibrating noise. I don't mean to dismiss you, but it definitely sounds more like arcing, as kirbyvertibles suggested.

Post# 347583 , Reply# 9   3/14/2016 at 20:33 (859 days old) by MPN ()        

Does the noise change with the belt removed???

Post# 347595 , Reply# 10   3/14/2016 at 23:29 (859 days old) by MPN ()        

"I don't mean to dismiss you, but it definitely sounds more like arcing, as kirbyvertibles suggested."

Brushes arching on the commutator makes a "hissing" or sputtering sound if the brushes and/or commutator are really worn.

Another thought . . . If the brushes are really worn down to where the spring tension is greatly decreased, the brushes will bounce especially if the commutator is very worn or out of round. This would explain the noise at start-up, that diminishes afterward as the brush float dampens out.


Post# 347737 , Reply# 11   3/16/2016 at 12:08 (857 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

I sometimes do hear the noise when the belt is removed. It is definitely more of a "sputtering" sound or a bunch of little scraping sounds. How would you recommend that I go about diagnosing this? What should I check for?

Post# 347739 , Reply# 12   3/16/2016 at 12:26 (857 days old) by blknblu (CT)        

A mechanics stethoscope could be used to isolate the noise.

The end is is a long hollow tube. For electrical, I put a piece of clear tubing  on the end.

Have to be careful around electricity you know.

They are less than $5 at Harbor Freight ..

 


  View Full Size
Post# 347890 , Reply# 13   3/18/2016 at 11:28 (855 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        
Those tools sure are useful…

…but it seems pretty clear to me that the noise is coming from the brush/armature area. I would like to know if I should disassemble the motor and, if so, what I should examine inside the motor and what I should do depending on what I find.

Post# 347905 , Reply# 14   3/18/2016 at 16:02 (855 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
Could be a small build up of dust on the brushes/commy.

Post# 347994 , Reply# 15   3/19/2016 at 11:20 (854 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

How would you suggest I clean it?

Post# 347995 , Reply# 16   3/19/2016 at 11:41 (854 days old) by HooverCelebrity ()        

Can you post any pictures of the machine? How about a model number? Have you tried completely rebuilding the motor instead of hypothesizing about what's wrong? That's what I do with most all of my machines, and they all run very nicely.

Post# 348118 , Reply# 17   3/20/2016 at 16:45 (853 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        
Here are some pics:

Close ups of armature, brushes and lower bearing. Motor was very dirty at first; I had to vacuum it out. The model is 719. Let me know what you think.

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Post# 348147 , Reply# 18   3/21/2016 at 05:04 (852 days old) by MPN ()        
Hmmmmmmmmm ? ? ?

From shat I'm seeing in the first photo, the shaft seems to gave a blue tinge indicating overheating due to lack of lubrication. This could very well be your noise!

While you have it apart, if you have access to a lathe, check the commutator for out of round. If it is out of round, do a few fine cuts just enough to re-round it.

Oil the hell out of that Oilite-bronz bearing or bearings with synthetic oil prior to re-assembly.

Also, REMEMBER to re-install the brushes in the same holder and position as removed, so they don't chatter and/or ark . . .


Post# 348149 , Reply# 19   3/21/2016 at 07:44 (852 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

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The brushes look like they have a slight chattering problem IMHO and they also look like they have over heated. The commy looks like it has slight threading and bar burning which would back up the statement of the brushes.

Also I on just seen your other comment. When there's q slight dust build up I just wipe the brushes and commy with a soft cloth.

And, if it's not too much of a problem, would it be possible to ser the brushes'"face" (that's what I nickname the part that touches the commy.)

If it has a slight line through it, that would also back up my statement of dust build up on the commy.

I don't know about anyone else but it looks like there's slight arcing too.


Post# 348158 , Reply# 20   3/21/2016 at 10:48 (852 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        
Very interesting!

Now I wonder why the shaft is not getting lubricated. I have been regularly lubricating the sleeve bearing with 3-in-1 electric motor oil; first cleaning out the sleeve with oil soaked Q-tips and then placing a drop on each felt pad. Could there be a problem with the bearing?

@MPN: What should I use to machine the commutator? Fine sandpaper? I have heard of these electric motor commutator cleaning sticks. Would you recommend them?


Post# 348169 , Reply# 21   3/21/2016 at 13:51 (852 days old) by MPN ()        
Well, here goes . . .

"@MPN: What should I use to machine the commutator? Fine sandpaper? I have heard of these electric motor commutator cleaning sticks. Would you recommend them?"

Like I said: A lathe is the best method, if you have access to one.

If you're not going to take that approach, use GARNET or WET N' DRY sand paper.

NEVER USE EMERY or CROCUS CLOTH, as they contain metal that can short the commutator segments and destroy the armature!!!

Also, you'll want to burnish (slightly dull-down) the bearing surfaces on the armature shaft with a Scotch Bright Pad, until the blue disappears so lubricant is able to penetrate into the metal. At this point you have nothing to lose, as Oilite-bronz bearings are impregnated with oil at the factory, that overheating vaporizes away.



Post# 348170 , Reply# 22   3/21/2016 at 14:01 (852 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        
More pics:

@vacuumlover: Here are the "faces" of the brushes. Hopefully this is clear enough for you to see, but from my perspective, they do look a little scratched up. BTW, the last time I ran the motor by itself without the brushroll and belt attached, the motor was somewhat noisier than it probably should be.

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Post# 348171 , Reply# 23   3/21/2016 at 14:16 (852 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
Lovely. Thank you for the pictures. Yep, there's dust build up on the commy surface. Quite badly too as they are very scratched. This is causing poor contact with the commy thus causing excessive sparking.

In this case, what I do is ~ wipe down the commy with a soft cloth to remove any dust. Then what I do is use wet and dry sand paper. Starting with coarse and working to fine until the segmentation is gone. What I do to make it easier for the brushes to seat is try and rub the sand paper in a curving motion to try and keep as much shape of the brush as possible. (This makes it less faffing around to seat them)

Hope this helps 😊

Also, it doesn't look like there's any chattering problems. Just over heating which has made the brushes "melt" In this case using the wet and dry sandpaper (just using a fine grade) is rub it evenly from the sides of the brushes.

If it's any easier I can try and get a video.


Post# 348173 , Reply# 24   3/21/2016 at 14:20 (852 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

@MPN: I might be able to get my hands on a lathe. Could I use Garnet or wet/dry sandpaper on the lathe or would you recommend something different to machine the commutator? Also, what specific type of Scotch Brite pad should I be using to clean the shaft

Post# 348175 , Reply# 25   3/21/2016 at 14:26 (852 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

@vacuumlover: Thank you for the tips. I am learning quite a bit of valuable info from this thread as I do not have much experience servicing electric motors beyond lubricating bearings. Do you use the sandpaper dry or with a liquid?

Post# 348177 , Reply# 26   3/21/2016 at 15:14 (852 days old) by HooverCelebrity ()        

If you use sandpaper, do it dry, I imagine.

I personally use commutator cleaning stones and have always had good luck with those; that's what we used whenever I worked in a vacuum store. There's one that is a rubberized abrasive stone which I use before I wash an armature - then I use a diamond seating stone after; before I reassemble the motor to polish the commutator plates. A Hoover Convertible is tricky, because you can't really get a brush stone into the running motor, as you can with other types of motors.

I would also recommend not over-lubricating your upper bearing, that could be causing some of the problem. You should be able to find a new upper bearing relatively easily - you may just want to replace it and be done with it. You might want to find a new pair of carbon brushes, as well.


Post# 348179 , Reply# 27   3/21/2016 at 15:45 (852 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
Always use it dry. Make sure you wipe /vacuum the commy and brushes afterwards to remove any dust/sand.

Post# 348190 , Reply# 28   3/21/2016 at 16:53 (852 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        
Thanks for all the tips!

@HooverCelebrity: If I were to use a lathe, as MPN suggested, I would imagine I could easily use commutator stones, am I wrong?
@vacuumlover: Would 220 grit be good enough, or should I use something finer?


Post# 348207 , Reply# 29   3/21/2016 at 21:35 (852 days old) by MPN ()        
Well, ummmmmmmmm ? ? ?

"@HooverCelebrity: If I were to use a lathe, as MPN suggested, I would imagine I could easily use commutator stones, am I wrong?"

NO! use the lathe's cutting tool bit, because you want to remove as little material as possible to achieve "Concentricity". Using a hand-held stone will only follow the "Eccentricity" of the OUT OF ROUND commutator MAKING MATTERS WORSE!

1.Turn the commutator on a lathe until concentric. 2.Finish dress with a fine Scotch-Bright Pad.


Post# 348225 , Reply# 30   3/22/2016 at 03:07 (851 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
Yep. 220 is what I use.

Post# 348234 , Reply# 31   3/22/2016 at 08:32 (851 days old) by HooverCelebrity ()        

Well, for those of us who aren't able to go to the lathe store and pick up a lathe, the stones work just fine. I've rebuilt hundreds of vacuum cleaner motors over the years, the majority of those being Hoover Convertibles, and have never once had a problem using them. I still maintain that you should put new carbon brushes in, anytime you rebuild the motor.

Post# 348240 , Reply# 32   3/22/2016 at 10:11 (851 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        
@HooverU4089 (reply #20)

vacuumlover's profile picture
Sorry but I just realised that I've skipped out the part of the bearings. They do look a little rough and IMHO I would just replace both.

Post# 348244 , Reply# 33   3/22/2016 at 12:15 (851 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

I am just trying to put 2-and-2 together since each of you seem to have different opinions. Based on your suggestions, I think I will replace the upper bearing and brushes. I searched the web for commutator stones, as HooverCelebrity advised, but they all seem to be at least $50 (perhaps you know if I can get them any cheaper).

@MPN: I am aware that there are several types of Scotch Brite pads (i.e. scouring, scrubbing, stripping, etc.), obviously for different purposes. Which do you use to clean the commutator shafts of these motors?

@HooverCelebrity: I am just curious, since you stated that it is difficult to stick a commutator stone into a running Hoover Convertible motor, if it would be easier to put the commutator on a rotating lathe.


Post# 348245 , Reply# 34   3/22/2016 at 12:22 (851 days old) by MPN ()        
Point well taken, but . . .

"Well, for those of us who aren't able to go to the lathe store and pick up a lathe, the stones work just fine."

I offered my comment regarding truing the commutator on a lathe as he'd already disassembled the vacuum, his noise complaint, brush wear, and the photos indicating lack of lubrication discoloring the armature shaft.

My uncle owned an electric motor rebuild shop for 45-years, retiring the end of last year. I worked in his shop many summers, and learned a few things along the way. The main thing I learned was "Commutator Concentricity" is essential to ensure the longevity of a motor rebuild, ESPECIALLY in situations similar to this one where these kind of are noises are involved.

We used ROTARY stones mounted in a Dremel-type motor fitted to the lathe's tool holder to "Finish Dress" commutators, once they were cut and trued. Your complaint is centered around a "sputtering noise" common with arcing as result of brush float likely created by worn brushes, thus weakening brush spring tension. Here's the paradox: A machine shop will likely charge you $10-$15 to chuck your armature up in their lathe. Is your old vacuum worth $10-$15?


Post# 348254 , Reply# 35   3/22/2016 at 13:41 (851 days old) by HooverCelebrity ()        

Thanks for the clarification and the advice. I'll have to look into finding a local motor rebuild shop that will do that if I ever find an armature that has too much of a wear groove in it (usually I have spares, and just swap the part for a new one). I certainly didn't mean to question your knowledge; it must have been nice to have machines such as lathes available to you whenever you needed them. It's certainly becoming a thing of the past; I'm surprised when I google it in Minneapolis, that a few still pop up!

I personally don't think that the armature looks all that bad, although the picture isn't crystal clear. I've certainly seen worse! A bit of very fine sandpaper might even do the trick for you to get the initial layer of "gunk" off.

I did find the commutator stones online - SteelCityVac.com; they're a vacuum parts supplier. They have the brown stones (2pk for $28), and the white diamond stones (4pk for $15). Yes, perhaps likely pricier than $10-15 that getting the commutator re-cut may cost, but if you rebuild machines with any regularity, these will come in handy!


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Post# 348257 , Reply# 36   3/22/2016 at 14:22 (851 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

@MPN: I do have a Dremel tool if you think that could be useful. If so, could you explain that technique again because I was not quite understanding it.

As I am reading each of your comments, I also thought about running the commutator in a lathe and holding up a strip of sandpaper just enough to remove the gunk evenly while truing the shape. Again I am simply trying to put 2-and-2 together but I would like to hear what you think of that idea, if it makes sense.


Post# 348273 , Reply# 37   3/22/2016 at 15:56 (851 days old) by MPN ()        

www.vacuumland.org/TD/JPEG/BASKET...

OK, now you have almost $30.00 tied up in stones ALONE, that could have the whole job done by a PROFESSIONAL on a lathe for around HALF of that. YOU DO THE MATH ! ! !


Post# 348274 , Reply# 38   3/22/2016 at 16:05 (851 days old) by HooverCelebrity ()        

Those stones will last for years - many, many, many rebuilds. I've been on the same set of stones for at least the past 5 years. Consider all of the time and money I'd have spent if I took every armature into a motor shop every time I serviced a machine.

-Gas to drive it there
-They probably couldn't do it while I wait
-Gas to drive back home
-Gas to drive and pick it up
-Gas to drive it back home
-likely a multi-day process

Usually I just want to get my motor rebuilt so I can get the cleaner back together and go about using it.

:-)


Post# 348278 , Reply# 39   3/22/2016 at 16:14 (851 days old) by HooverCelebrity ()        

I don't think you need to put the motor in a drill; you could, just be careful not to bend or strip any of the threading which the fan nut screws onto. Also be careful not to damage the upper part of the armature, the part which fits into the upper bearing.

See the following two pictures - Taken directly from the Hoover Service manual, sanding by hand is acceptable.


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Post# 348301 , Reply# 40   3/22/2016 at 22:06 (851 days old) by MPN ()        
maybe so . . .

"Consider all of the time and money I'd have spent if I took every armature into a motor shop every time I serviced a machine."

We used to growl, short-test, and machine armatures for janitorial and restaurant equipment companies, appliance repair shops, and appliance stores. They'd send bin boxes of complete motors, armatures, and field windings with their corresponding work order numbers marked on tags. Needless to say volume pricing was in effect.

I remember a guy coming in with an armature from a commercial dough mixer, that was between a rock and a hard place as hundreds of pounds of fermenting dough was spoiling as time passed. My cousin threw it on the growler, short-tested it, cut and dressed the commutator on the lathe, and handed it off to him. When the guy asked what he owed, my uncle knowing his dilemma, told him to "Beat it!" You might get lucky as well . . .

The ONLY REASON I recommended truing the commutator on a lathe is due to YOUR NOISE COMPLAINT and that's it!!!


Post# 348356 , Reply# 41   3/23/2016 at 13:36 (850 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

Here's the commutator after sanding w/ 220-grit wet/dry sandpaper. How does it look?

  View Full Size
Post# 348357 , Reply# 42   3/23/2016 at 13:48 (850 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
Looks much better IMHO. Belooks of it there's copper drag and bar burning. This is due to the commy over heating multiple times. Not sure how one fixes that though. If at all.

Post# 348360 , Reply# 43   3/23/2016 at 14:01 (850 days old) by MPN ()        
You look at it and tell me . . .

"Here's the commutator after sanding w/ 220-grit wet/dry sandpaper. How does it look?"

Well, whatta YOU think ? ? ?

Are the commutator segments linear & flat longitudinally to provide full brush contact ? ? ?


Post# 348365 , Reply# 44   3/23/2016 at 14:42 (850 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

"Are the commutator segments linear & flat longitudinally to provide full brush contact ? ? ?"
@MPN: Looks like it to me! I just thought I would keep all of you updated on my progress. Like I said before, I have very little experience servicing electric motors; I imagine those of you who have been providing input have considerably more experience (or at least HooverCelebrity does, LOL!).

@vacuumlover: MPN mentioned earlier in the thread that the overheating could be the result of lack of lubrication due to the buildup on the upper bearing shaft of the armature. I still have not gotten to that yet; I ran out of Scotch Brite pads. Would a soft wire brush also work for removing this buildup, BTW?


Post# 348382 , Reply# 45   3/23/2016 at 16:49 (850 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
Yep. Steel wool works too. You've just got to make sure that there is no wire left. Vacuum and wipe it a lot afterwards.

Post# 348391 , Reply# 46   3/23/2016 at 17:59 (850 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

I could try steel wool. Not sure what you mean by "[y]ou've just got to make sure that there is no wire left."

Post# 348395 , Reply# 47   3/23/2016 at 18:17 (850 days old) by MPN ()        

"@MPN: Looks like it to me!"

It doesn't to me from what I'm seeing in your photo. I should be seeing CONSISTANTLY FRESH, CLEAN, and SMOOTH COPPER COMMUTATOR SEGMENTS!

Did you lay a straight edge along each commutator segment, and hold the armature up to the light to see if there's a gap between the copper and ruler?

"I ran out of Scotch Brite pads. Would a soft wire brush also work for removing this buildup, BTW?"

NO! You need the cutting-action of the powdered industrial diamonds in Scotch-Bright pads.

As far as the Oilite-Bronze bearings are concerned, the BLUE discoloring on the motor shaft pretty much indicates they've been overheated to the point of the lubricant permeated into 'em at the factory being long since vaporized away!

You're now at the point of asking yourself: Is all this really worth it??? The ONLY REASON I went as far as I did with my vacuum is that it was a brand-new Royal Metal Upright that was about $400.00 new in the original box with ONLY ONE PART robbed from it, given to me for free! I now have a NEW commercial-grade vacuum cleaner for a few bucks and an hour or so of my time.


Post# 348407 , Reply# 48   3/23/2016 at 20:05 (850 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        
After reading all of your suggestions…

…I am inclined to think that a little more sanding of the commutator, a cleanup of the shaft, a new upper bearing and a new set of carbon brushes should do the trick. If anyone thinks that there's more to it, I would certainly appreciate further advice. Considering that this vacuum cleaner is in excellent cosmetic condition overall with all of its original parts, I would think it's worth repairing.

Post# 348411 , Reply# 49   3/23/2016 at 20:49 (850 days old) by MPN ()        
Whatever floats yer boat . . .

"…I am inclined to think that a little more sanding of the commutator, a cleanup of the shaft, a new upper bearing and a new set of carbon brushes should do the trick. If anyone thinks that there's more to it, I would certainly appreciate further advice. Considering that this vacuum cleaner is in excellent cosmetic condition overall with all of its original parts, I would think it's worth repairing."

The bottom line is that it's your vacuum cleaner, to do with as YOU please.

You kept going on and on for suggestions, so I assumed (I hate that word) that you were really out to do the job RIGHT THE FIRST TIME! I repair & restore exotic cars for a living, so when I repair ANYTHING, I repair it so it DOESN'T COME BACK. I MAKE MORE MONEY and stay outta court that way.

Now that I know your real prerogative, just throw it back together and don't waste anymore time ! ! !


Post# 348423 , Reply# 50   3/24/2016 at 00:14 (849 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        
@HooveU4089 (reply #40)

vacuumlover's profile picture
When using steel wool, there's little bits of wire that come off of the wire pad that fall on the armature.

Post# 348425 , Reply# 51   3/24/2016 at 00:23 (849 days old) by MPN ()        

"When using steel wool, there's little bits of wire that come off of the wire pad that fall on the armature."

THE FASTEST WAY TO KILL an electric motor ! ! !



Post# 348429 , Reply# 52   3/24/2016 at 03:02 (849 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
That's why I said to make sure you vacuum it and "dust" it to make sure there is no remaining wire.

Post# 348431 , Reply# 53   3/24/2016 at 03:43 (849 days old) by MPN ()        
Ummmmmmmmmmmmm . . . NOPE ! ! !

"That's why I said to make sure you vacuum it and "dust" it to make sure there is no remaining wire."

The problem here is, PULVORIZED DANDRUFF from steel wool (or "WIRE WOOL" as you Brits call it) gets imbedded in the phenolic micas that insulate each commutator segment from each other, partially shorting them out with each other until the commutator gets hot enough to melt and sling solder from the neck connections.

To put things in plain English for you: You're striking matches on a dynamite keg ! ! !


Post# 348435 , Reply# 54   3/24/2016 at 05:39 (849 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
I don't know if you're purposely trying to add fuel to my fire or not, but trust me, I've done it enough times before and my motors have (and still are) turned out perfectly fine.

Yes, it's best to use wet and dry sand paper, but as a last resort (if one doesn't have or can't get wet and dry sand paper) then steel wool is a last resort.

Oh and there's no need to say "To put things in plain English for you."

I am quite capable of understating what you have said without you needing to patronize me.


Post# 348436 , Reply# 55   3/24/2016 at 08:16 (849 days old) by HooverCelebrity ()        

I think that armature looks great. Add some new carbon brushes to the mix, and hopefully a new upper motor bearing, and you will be Hoovering again in no-time. I do love the model 719 - it was the first Convertible of that style that I ever had; was given to me by an elderly couple when I was 11 years old.

At this point, you could also run the armature through the dishwasher to make sure it's clean as can be - I do this with all of my motors as part of the restoration process - a trick I picked up from Tom Gasko many years ago. I just keep an eye on it and don't let it go through the dry cycle. I then let it dry overnight with a fan running to keep air circulating around the parts that are washed.


Post# 348459 , Reply# 56   3/24/2016 at 10:44 (849 days old) by hooverU4089 (CT)        

I used an air compressor and blow gun after I sanded the commutator and cleaned the shaft. That appeared to clean it up well. I also have a small ultrasonic cleaner if any of you would still suspect that there could be fine pieces of steel wool.

Thanks for all the tips; I think I have a good handle now on how to finish this job. I think my other convertible of the same vintage could use a little TLC as well. If possible, I'll try to give an update after I buy the parts.


Post# 348463 , Reply# 57   3/24/2016 at 10:54 (849 days old) by vacuumlover (Chaddesden, Derby, UK)        

vacuumlover's profile picture
An air compressor should of gotten rid of all the wire.



Post# 348497 , Reply# 58   3/24/2016 at 20:01 (849 days old) by kenkart (Mocksville, NC)        
Re dishwaher cleaning of motor parts.

Clay Floyd came up with that idea many years ago, he used to run everything thru the DW except the carbon brushes, when he got thru you had a practically new machine.




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