Thread Number: 17718
Rainbow D3 Rebuild!!!!
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Post# 191961   7/28/2012 at 21:20 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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Well, the bearing plate for which I've been waiting finally arrived, so I was able to to complete the rebuild that began over one month ago.  This photo reveals why the rebuild was necessary.  Notice the vents around the periphery of the motor housing.  It is through these vents that air flows.  Some of them were completely covered over with dirt. 





Post# 191962 , Reply# 1   7/28/2012 at 21:22 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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The most important components -- the armature and motor field.  Without them, nothing happens!


Post# 191963 , Reply# 2   7/28/2012 at 21:24 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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Motor field assembled inside the motor housing.


Post# 191964 , Reply# 3   7/28/2012 at 21:27 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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I'm not sure what these vents are for.  I suppose if you want to bench test the motor, you can observe what's going on.  However, you can't access the commutator in order to seat motor brushes. 


Post# 191965 , Reply# 4   7/28/2012 at 21:28 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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Motor housing vent closed.


Post# 191967 , Reply# 5   7/28/2012 at 21:32 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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I'll try to move this along.  This bearing is actually an upgrade from the one originally used.  By the time the D4 came along, Rainbow started using a double sealed bearing on the bottom.  Since it fits, I did the upgrade. 


Post# 191968 , Reply# 6   7/28/2012 at 21:38 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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And here's the bearing plate that was so hard to get!!!  Notice how the plastic shell surrounds the motor housing.  That's because the fans draw air through the vents on the bottom of the motor, around the motor itself, and finally through the holes in the periphery of the bearing plate. 


Post# 191970 , Reply# 7   7/28/2012 at 21:40 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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This bushing/grommet, which is missing in the previous photo, is important to prevent air leaks!


Post# 191972 , Reply# 8   7/28/2012 at 21:43 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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Now, the fan assembly begins, starting with the "air guide" which goes on top of the bearing plate.  There are three "stages" to this fan assembly.  Each fan stage has its own housing air guide and spacers. 




This post was last edited 07/28/2012 at 22:26
Post# 191973 , Reply# 9   7/28/2012 at 21:46 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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And here it is, all assembled and installed in the lower housing!  Before assembling all the fans, I recommend testing the motor.  If something isn't right, you won't have to go through the head ache of taking everything apart again!  Mine tested out just fine.  Smile


Post# 191975 , Reply# 10   7/28/2012 at 21:47 (2,123 days old) by vacumaniac ()        

Awesome!!! Cannot wait to see the final fully assembled unit pics!!!!

Post# 191979 , Reply# 11   7/28/2012 at 21:57 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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During the rebuild process, I messed up the end of the armature shaft while trying to loosen a stubborn nut.  So I had to do some filing in order to knock off the high spots so the separator nut would fit.  One of the things I find interesting is that the motor support ring has a lip that also serves as a secondary gasket for the water basin.  In case someone is wondering, I did install the rest of the screws in the flange!  LOL!  I mention that, because I often forget to do something!  Foot in mouth


Post# 191980 , Reply# 12   7/28/2012 at 21:59 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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And the final step -- installing the motor gasket on the flange. 


Post# 191982 , Reply# 13   7/28/2012 at 22:00 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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And here she is!  All dressed up and ready to go!  Cool


Post# 191983 , Reply# 14   7/28/2012 at 22:03 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        
EPILOGUE

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Servicing the D3 motor is a much more labor intensive job than the D4.  This is the second one I've done and I still haven't found a more efficient way of doing things. 


Post# 191992 , Reply# 15   7/28/2012 at 22:36 (2,123 days old) by kloveland (Tulsa, OK)        
Looks almost new!

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Just found a Rainbow D2 at an Estate Sale today. It would not run so I got it for six bucks. Brought it home and took off the switch housing and made sure the wires were tight because the switch was loose. It fired right up, but sounds horrible. It needs some bearing work. May have to ask for assistance on this one. I've never repaired bearings on a rainbow.

Post# 191993 , Reply# 16   7/28/2012 at 22:54 (2,123 days old) by rainbowjoel (Dexter NM)        

so cool, but I am confused. So the top of motor is just sucking just air?

Post# 192031 , Reply# 17   7/29/2012 at 07:41 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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@ Kenny -- the motor setup in your D2 is very similar to this one.  However, there is ONE major difference.  Air flows through the motor instead of around the motor.

 

@ Joel -- You've noticed the MAJOR difference in this motor from the D4 and E2 designs.  With the newer models, the fans sit directly on the water basin.  However with the D3 and earlier models, everything is flipped.  The fans are on top and the motor sits directly on the water basin. 


Post# 192076 , Reply# 18   7/29/2012 at 13:58 (2,123 days old) by rainbowjoel (Dexter NM)        

Yes I am glad u posted pictures. So the fans on top are just keep the motor cool?

Post# 192139 , Reply# 19   7/29/2012 at 16:18 (2,123 days old) by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        
@ Joel

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No, the fans on top are the suction fans.  Take a look at the above photos.  In the photo of the bottom bearing and bearing boot -- that is actually the bottom of the motor assembly where the spider and separator attaches.  Notice all the slots around the the periphery.  Air is sucked by the fans (on top) through those holes.  The air is then vented around the sides of the motor before passing through the holes around the periphery of the bearing plate and finally into the fan assembly itself.  The fan assembly sits on top of that bearing plate.  Notice too the plastic shroud that surrounds the motor.  It keeps the air flow concentrated and directed from the slots on the bottom of the motor (water pan side) and up through the periphery of the bearing plate and finally through the suction fans themselves.  With the D4, Rainbow went to a completely different (and more efficient and compact) motor/fan design with the motor itself on top and the fan assembly on the bottom where the spider and separator are attached.  The D3 motor does look awkward because it looks top heavy.  But the fan assembly on top is actually very light (being made of aluminum, I think).  Once the motor is attached to its support ring and the support ring is attached to the lower vacuum housing, it is very stable.  Additional support and stability is provided by the plastic baffle inside the top housing of the vacuum.  You can see the stripped baffle through the opaque plastic on top.  By the way, there is an internal cooling fan on the armature too.  You can see that in the second photo.  The attached photo is a more clear view of the top of the bearing plate where the fan assembly sits.  Again, the fans draw air through those holes around the periphery.  (I took this photo while "bench testing" the motor before I assembled the fans on top of it)


Post# 192147 , Reply# 20   7/29/2012 at 16:42 (2,123 days old) by cam2s (Nebraska)        
D3C

Very interesting! I haven't taken the time to take my D3 apart, but at least I know what the inside of the machine looks like now. Thanks for the insights!

Post# 192239 , Reply# 21   7/30/2012 at 09:33 (2,122 days old) by rainbowjoel (Dexter NM)        
eurekastar

thanks explaining. I got it now. How is the suction compared to D4? I love to see it running on youtube?

Post# 385762 , Reply# 22   2/10/2018 at 19:07 by vacuumdevil (Denver)        
rather than creating a new thread.

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Beautiful rebuild hope ours turns out this well .

Here's the video of part 1






Post# 385767 , Reply# 23   2/10/2018 at 19:59 by kenkart (Mocksville, NC)        
If you dont know any swear words

Rebuild one or 2 of these...You will!!!!

Post# 385776 , Reply# 24   2/10/2018 at 20:46 by eurekastar (Amarillo, Texas)        

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Good luck! I almost lost my Jesus rebuilding my D3!




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